Investing to Achieve Your Goals

Denali Wealth Management Advisors provides investors with evidence-based, tax-efficient investment strategies supported by peer-reviewed financial research.

What We Do

We create tailored wealth planning solutions that consider your goals and dreams while negotiating barriers that impact each stage of life. We believe in delivering holistic, transparent, tax-efficient advice.

Who We Serve

Everyone has their own meaningful life goals. We are committed to helping individuals achieve those goals by taking the time to focus on delivering true wealth management services, not just money management. We develop financial plans that integrate estate and tax planning and risk management while considering each client’s unique strategy and personal situation along with the willingness, ability and need to accept market risk.

Resources

Denali’s wealth management resources keep you informed about the latest topics, insights and research.

Who We Are

Denali Wealth Management Advisors is a registered investment advisor with the State of Indiana and an affiliate of Indianapolis-based public accounting firm, BGBC Partners, LLP. Our commitment to investors is simple: to provide unbiased, personalized investment strategies backed by peer-reviewed financial research.

Learning Center

If the pandemic has proven anything, it’s that life-altering occasions—both those we experience firsthand and those that merely present themselves as possibilities—have the potential to uproot even the firmest of financial plans. Why? Because reminders of what’s most important to us—wake up calls about how we spend our time and, as an extension, our money—can and should trigger reevaluation of our plans for the future.


And although the exact nature of any pandemic-related changes to a financial plan will look different for everyone, a few common themes have surfaced over the last year and a half that are worth discussing with your advisor:

Risk Tolerance—Has the pandemic changed the way you look at your willingness, need or ability to assume risk in your portfolio? How did you react to last year’s market volatility? Rebalancing your asset allocation can help you adjust back to your plan based on how things have changed.

Ask: Am I comfortable taking market risks anymore?

Saving and Spending—For many, staying at home meant a new perspective on dollars saved and dollars spent. Does your financial plan still reflect your cashflow needs in 2021? Events of the last year may also have underscored the need for an emergency fund in case of an unexpected job loss or health crises.

Ask: Does my budget reflect how I actually spend these days? Am I prepared financially if something unexpected happens?

Travel—Whether you have the itch to change things up after staring at the same four walls for too long or “someday” bucket-list trips took on a new sort of urgency, consider what impact travel investments can have on your overall plan.

Ask: Since tomorrow is never promised, is it finally time to take that dream trip?

Remodeling—Home additions, lifestyle upgrades, finally putting in that pool—there is no doubt that 2020 gave way to a wave of home improvement projects. Doing so can have a material impact on one of your most important assets.

Ask: Is the investment to make my space more comfortable a prudent one?

Relocating—Considering a major move to be closer to family or maybe finally buying that second home in a place that you truly love? Real estate moves come with tax implications that should be on the agenda next time you speak to your advisor.

Ask: Should I move closer to family?

Planning for Retirement—Did the pandemic remind you how much you missed working, or maybe how little your 9-to-5 actually matters to your happiness? If your timeline for retirement has changed, your financial plan will need to, too. Tax changes could also predicate a change in how you’re saving for retirement and warrant a closer look at your situation.

Ask: Am I doing all I can to plan for the retirement I now envision?

Wills and Estate Planning—The pandemic prompted many to consider how prepared they or their loved ones are for end-of-life. As an extension of that, making sure your estate plan is in order became more important than ever.

Ask: Are my affairs in order and do they reflect my most up-to-date wishes?

Whatever realizations may have arisen for you, and whether you think they’re large or small, make sure they are figuring into your financial plan designed and built with the contours of your life in mind.

The opinions expressed by featured authors are their own and may not accurately reflect those of Buckingham Strategic Wealth®. This article is for general information only and is not intended to serve as specific financial, accounting or tax advice. Individuals should speak with qualified professionals based upon their individual circumstances. The analysis contained in this article may be based upon third-party information and may become outdated or otherwise superseded without notice. Third-party information is deemed to be reliable, but its accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed. IRN-21-2495

© 2021 Buckingham Strategic Wealth®

As we’ve learned, economic circumstances can at times change relatively quickly and unpredictably. Companies in some sectors may suffer while others thrive. Your personal economy, which is based on your particular situation, may be completely different than your neighbor’s.


It often feels like trying to predict what things will cost and where the economy is going is like throwing darts blindfolded. Take your best guess. You can listen to 10 different economists on any given day and get 10 very diverse opinions on where the economy is headed. And what is happening in your state or hometown is often much different than what is happening in other regions of the country.

Supply and demand are key factors in pricing. Housing costs have increased significantly over the last couple years as we come out of the COVID-19 pandemic. Because basic building costs have skyrocketed, homebuyers are looking for existing homes and the inventory is low.

People are on the move, some to areas where more opportunities exist currently. And people are relocating to where they truly want to be and living costs are less. They have learned that they can work remotely. No more lengthy commutes to and from the office.

Even though your economic circumstances can change suddenly, you can still plan and prepare yourself for whichever way the wind may blow. Are your finances resilient enough to effectively withstand whatever headwinds may come your way?

Look ahead at what could change in your life. What if you lose your job or your business? What if your spouse loses a job? What if you get sick and cannot work? We all know someone who has gotten into financial difficulties. We tend to think these problems will never happen to us.

Pretend your income stops and living expenses keep rising. How much money will it take to pay your bills for as long as necessary? Knowing what’s required to support your family for six months or a year is good information. You can then prepare yourself by building a rainy-day fund.

Keeping your debt manageable is important when it comes to controlling your destiny. If you are living paycheck-to-paycheck because you are making payments on your house, cars, boats, snowmobiles and credit cards, consider a scenario in which you are unable to support those expenditures. Figure out what items are necessities and what things are luxuries, and consider starting to make some hard choices to get on sound financial ground.

Knowing in advance how you can adjust to changing circumstances can be comforting. Can you or your spouse afford to change careers? Are you willing to move to improve your financial picture? Can you spend less and save more to buffer your reserves? Knowing that your finances are able to sway with the wind will give you peace of mind and the knowledge you can weather any storm for as long as may be necessary.

A version of this commentary originally appeared July 3 in the Casper Star-Tribune.

The opinions expressed by featured authors are their own and may not accurately reflect those of Buckingham Strategic Wealth®. This article is for general information only and is not intended to serve as specific financial, accounting or tax advice. Individuals should speak with qualified professionals based upon their individual circumstances. The analysis contained in this article may be based upon third-party information and may become outdated or otherwise superseded without notice. Third-party information is deemed to be reliable, but its accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed.

By clicking on any of the links above, you acknowledge that they are solely for your convenience, and do not necessarily imply any affiliations, sponsorships, endorsements or representations whatsoever by us regarding third-party websites. We are not responsible for the content, availability or privacy policies of these sites, and shall not be responsible or liable for any information, opinions, advice, products or services available on or through them. IRN-21-2351

© 2021 Buckingham Strategic Wealth®

Despite a lengthy global pandemic, supply chain delays, inflationary spikes in segments of the economy, and a very tight labor market, your business is highly successful. Yet maybe these challenges, or even other circumstances, have placed financial pressure on your business that you still need to successfully navigate. Whether your business is currently healthy or under a bit of strain, a key question still needs asking: How is your personal financial situation?


A healthy business does not automatically translate into you being on a positive track toward your long-term financial priorities and goals. Similarly, a business with challenges does not automatically translate into a troubled personal financial situation. Business owners who have a healthy financial life have been intentional about achieving that success. Those who are not yet financially successful, or who do not know how to become intentional in pursuit of financial health, can implement 10 strategies to begin that journey.

1. Pay yourself first. Saving income into a qualified retirement plan, starting at the youngest age possible, can reward business owners with the power of compounding growth over a lifetime. The longer recurring deposits can be invested into a diversified portfolio, particularly when savings are pre-tax and grow tax-deferred over decades, the greater the likelihood that this will be the most beneficial financial opportunity available for achieving the lifestyle you want in retirement. As a hedge against higher future tax rates, consider also saving into a Roth 401(k) or Roth IRA.

2. Always know where your money should go. Optimally, a maximum of 50% of gross income will go toward financial needs: loan payments and taxes. The next 30% of income can go toward wants, otherwise known as lifestyle spending, allowing 20% to be saved toward long-time financial priorities.

3. Always know where your money does go. A fiduciary financial planner, or even budgeting software, can identify how your income is currently spread across your financial needs, wants and savings. If savings are not 10% to 20% of gross income, it greatly reduces the probability of funding future financial priorities.

4. Properly align financial priorities: needs, wants and savings. Reconcile the gap between where your money is going relative to where it should be going. Determine, either with a fiduciary financial planner or independently, how to redirect personal cash flow into the right categories. Then refresh a Monte Carlo analysis to stress-test if the redirected spending is projected to sufficiently fund your future priorities. If not, work through the spending exercise until your projections show that you are on track to reach your goals.

5. Properly align loans with the debt payment ratio. This principle is contradictory to how most people think. Rather than paying down debt as quickly as possible or avoiding debt altogether, wealth can accumulate tax-efficiently at a faster rate through pairing an intentional debt repayment methodology with the funding of a qualified retirement plan or other tax-efficient vehicle. Keys to success include establishing or refinancing into loans with tax-deductible interest and/or very low fixed rates with longer terms. Proceeds from any reduction in required monthly loan payments should be entirely redirected into savings, rather than spent on lifestyle.

6. Design the best company retirement plan for your cash flow. Small business owners can utilize standard or even custom-designed company retirement plans to save very large sums annually on a pre-tax and tax-deferred basis. Through a defined contribution 401(k) profit sharing plan, and potentially even a defined benefit plan paired with it, retirement plans can provide the single largest tax and saving benefit for business owners.

7. Make peace with how much you can afford to spend. After years of subsistence-level living through school or during the start-up phase of your business, nobody wants to eat mac ‘n’ cheese indefinitely to be able to save aggressively. Yet, maybe one shouldn’t buy the most expensive home in the neighborhood or stretch on luxury vehicles until implementing a comprehensive plan that balances the wants of today with the need for long-term financial health.

8. Take a comprehensive approach to investing. Portfolios should be considered in aggregate and in the context of your need, ability and willingness to take investment risk. Picking stocks, or trying to anticipate which direction the stock market will go in the near-term, is a loser’s game. Assembling and rebalancing a globally diversified portfolio in pursuit of market-like returns follows the evidence of successful investing.

9. Manage risk through proper insurance coverage. Insurance transfers financial risk from an individual, or a business, to a larger pool of people and companies. Transferring risk protects against undesirable and unexpected events. Insurance is not an investment vehicle, and it is not a retirement plan structure. It is, however, critically important to be protected across many areas of risk at a proper level. Rely on a fee-only financial planner who does not sell insurance or have a commission-driven conflict of interest to help assess the areas and levels of coverage needed.

10. Establish an estate plan aligned with your objectives. A proper estate plan should include all documents that will empower successors upon one’s incapacitation or death, plus specify who and/or what will benefit from the transfer of possessions and assets after death. A critical step is to properly title all accounts and beneficiaries consistent with the priorities listed in these documents. Estate planning needs to be refreshed every five years, or more frequently if major events in life occur, to assess how changes in your circumstances and state or federal laws have impacted your plans. Many institutions will not accept documents that are older than five to seven years, further emphasizing the need to maintain your plan.

It is important to recognize that these strategies are not arbitrary but are instead designed to specifically support the pursuit of defined, personal financial goals. Rather than focusing only on your business operations, you should implement processes to comprehensively connect your business and your personal financial health. Your personal income starts with the bottom-line financial health of your business, yet, by applying these 10 strategies, your priorities for the future do not have to remain dependent solely on the present health of your business.

This commentary originally appeared July 14 on thestreet.com.

The opinions expressed by featured authors are their own and may not accurately reflect those of Buckingham Strategic Wealth®. This article is for general information only and is not intended to serve as specific financial, accounting or tax advice. Individuals should speak with qualified professionals based upon their individual circumstances. The analysis contained in this article may be based upon third-party information and may become outdated or otherwise superseded without notice. Third-party information is deemed to be reliable, but its accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed.

By clicking on any of the links above, you acknowledge that they are solely for your convenience, and do not necessarily imply any affiliations, sponsorships, endorsements or representations whatsoever by us regarding third-party websites. We are not responsible for the content, availability or privacy policies of these sites, and shall not be responsible or liable for any information, opinions, advice, products or services available on or through them. IRN-21-2305

© 2021 Buckingham Strategic Wealth®